Self-guided walking trail around Penrith
The Explore Penrith trail helps you discover the centre of Penrith.
« Stage 4 of 9 »
Congregational Church and Musgrave Hall
Walk map at Penrith Congregational Church and Musgrave Hall
  1. Proceed along Wilson Row back to Middlegate but look down Duke Street to see the old Congregational Church. This was built in 1865 on the site of the Ebenezer Chapel that had been founded in 1780. Samuel Plimsoll, remembered for the Plimsoll Line painted on ships’ hulls, attended this chapel. Mary Wilson, wife of former Prime Minister, Harold Wilson, attended this church; her father, the Revd Daniel Baldwin, was Congregational Minister of Penrith.
    The old Congregational Church window
    The old Congregational Church window
    The old Congregational Church
    The old Congregational Church
  2. Crossing Middlegate, the building now occupied by the Royal British Legion, is Musgrave Hall, the home of a branch of the Musgraves, whose main family was of Edenhall. The Musgrave heraldic arms are incorporated in the lintel of a former doorway facing Middlegate.
    Proceed along Middlegate.
    Penrith Royal British Legion building detail
    Royal British Legion building detail
Middlegate and Little Dockray
Walk map at Congregational Church and Musgrave Hall
  1. Opposite the first road on the left (Queen Street) note the lintel inscribed with ‘RLE 1697’ and a pair of shears, indicating this was the premises of a wool merchant. Weavers, tanners and tailors once occupied this street: the workers lived in cottages up narrow passages behind their employers’ premises that faced onto the street.
    Further up Middlegate, bear right into Little Dockray.
    Williamson Yard - lintel inscribed RLE 1697
    Williamson Yard - lintel inscribed RLE 1697
    Penrith Gibson Yard
    Gibson Yard
  2. The ‘General Wolfe’ on the right hand side dates from 1679 and is the only remaining public house of six that used to trade in Little Dockray. In 1829, the town had 57 public houses to serve a population of 5,383! This was because of the lack of safe drinking water; all ages drank beer of various strengths until the Board of Health put in mains water and proper drains from 1853.
    Turn right into Cornmarket.
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